Cache Valley Notebook: Lane Parker prepared for 2018 Cache County Fair

It wasn’t that long after last year’s Cache County Fair that discussions were underway to bring Lane Parker, of the well known Parker auctioneering family, on board as fair manager.

“Last fall after the county fair a couple of the county people who I really respect, because they put in huge amounts of volunteer time, asked me if I would do it. I said yes. They asked my wife if she would help me; she agreed; she loves the Fair as well.

“So we decided to dive into it, get to know who was involved. All the chairmen, all of the different volunteers who do so much of the organizing work, and tying all that together.”

He admits it has become a year-round commitment: working with the county council to know what they expect; securing judges who sometimes are scheduled out a year or two in advance; planning for vendor booths and food booths; arranging for the Carnival, which is another contract usually secured two years in advance.

“We had to let the Browns Carnival people know we were going to move them around a little because our new building had taken their old spot.”

Parker said the anticipated new Cache Events Center will be open during fair week. He said with a few more touches it will be finished.

“We have much more square footage in the new building and you will be able to see all the displays that in past years were spread out in three or four of the old buildings.”

Parker said after 18 years LaMont Poulsen has things under control at the rodeo.

“He has developed this into one of the outstanding rodeos in the intermountain west. I just want to make sure that he’s got all he needs from my side of the fair to make his operation work.”

As one regular at the fair for decades Parker said the motivation to be on hand for this one week of the year may be different for each person.

“I think they’re looking to reunite with friends. Folks who might have shown a lamb at the fair, they may have gotten their 4H start here. Now they have children that want to do the same. But now they live somewhere else; so they’re coming back home from southern Utah, perhaps Wyoming.”

He said he is anxious for everyone to know they can attend throughout the week and that parking is free.

It wasn’t that long after last year’s Cache County Fair that discussions were underway to bring Lane Parker, of the well known Parker auctioneering family, on board as fair manager.

“Last fall after the county fair a couple of the county people who I really respect, because they put in huge amounts of volunteer time, asked me if I would do it. I said yes. They asked my wife if she would help me; she agreed; she loves the Fair as well.

“So we decided to dive into it, get to know who was involved. All the chairmen, all of the different volunteers who do so much of the organizing work, and tying all that together.”

He admits it has become a year-round commitment: working with the county council to know what they expect; securing judges who sometimes are  scheduled out a year or two in advance; planning for vendor booths and food booths; arranging for the Carnival, which is another contract usually secured two years in advance.

“We had to let the Browns Carnival people know we were going to move them around a little because our new building had taken their old spot.”

Parker said the anticipated new Cache Events Center will be open during fair week. He said with a few more touches it will be finished.

“We have much more square footage in the new building and you will be able to see all the displays that in past years were spread out in three or four of the old buildings.”

Parker said after 18 years LaMont Poulsen has things under control at the rodeo.

“He has developed this into one of the outstanding rodeos in the intermountain west. I just want to make sure that he’s got all he needs from my side of the fair to make his operation work.”

As one regular at the fair for decades Parker said the motivation to be on hand for this one week of the year may be different for each person.

“I think they’re looking to reunite with friends. Folks who might have shown a lamb at the fair, they may have gotten their 4H start here. Now they have children that want to do the same. But now they live somewhere else; so they’re coming back home from southern Utah, perhaps Wyoming.”

He said he is anxious for everyone to know they can attend throughout the week and that parking is free.

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